TACKETT AWARDED $11.5 MILLION TO DEVELOP CENTER FOR TRANSLATIONAL PEDIATRIC RESEARCH

 

SMELTZER AWARDED $11 MILLION TO CONTINUE RESEARCH ON MICROBIAL PATHOGENS

 

COMMUNICATION SKILLS HONED AT STUDENT RESEARCH DAY

 

UAMS SCIENTISTS RECEIVE CANCER RESEARCH GRANTS

 

ARRESEARCH.ORG WEBSITE NOW OPEN FOR UAMS RESEARCHERS’ USE

 

NIH AWARDS UAMS $42 MILLION TO OVERSEE 17-SITE U.S. PEDIATRIC CLINICAL TRIAL NETWORK

 

RESEARCHERS COMBAT ANTIBIOTIC-RESISTANT INFECTIONS WITH NANODRUG
A research team led by University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) microbiologist Mark Smeltzer, Ph.D., and University of Arkansas chemist Jingyi Chen, Ph.D., has developed an alternative therapeutic approach using a gold nanodrug to fighting antibiotic-resistant infections.

 

FDA CONTRACT FUNDS UAMS LUNG CANCER RESEARCH
UAMS physician-scientist, Don Johann, Jr., MD has received a $764,000 contract from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to study a new method for lung cancer screening.  The 3-year study will focus on detecting non-small cell lung cancer of the adenocarcinoma subtype.

 

HAUER-JENSEN RECEIVES 5-YEAR COBRE GRANT TO STUDY SIDE EFFECTS OF RADIATION THERAPY
Martin Hauer-Jensen, M.D., Ph.D., FACS, Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Surgery, and Pathology and Dir., Div. of Radiation Health, College of Pharmacy received a 5-year COBRE grant from the NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences for a total of over $10 million. The Center for Studies of Host Response to Cancer Therapy will be the first research center of its type in the United States. It will be a self-sustaining, multidisciplinary research center that examines the mechanisms of and prevention strategies for cancer-therapy-induced toxicity and side effects. It will also nurture junior scientific investigators with a research focus in this area to establish themselves as independent scientists.

 

OWENS GETS FUNDING TO EXAMINE DRUGS OF ABUSE
Mike Owens, Ph.D., Professor, Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology received a 4 year R01 grant from NIH/NIDA titled “Pharmacology and Therapy for MDPV and alpha-PVP Like Drugs of Abuse.”  Total recommended funding for all years, subject to fund availability and project progress is $2,419,611.

 

MACKINTOSH RECEIVES NIH HIGH-END INSTRUMENTATION GRANT
Samuel Mackintosh, Ph.D., Instructor, Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in the College of Medicine, was awarded an $850,000 NIH High-End Instrumentation Grant for the purchase of an Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid mass spectrometer to be housed in the UAMS Proteomics Core. It will allow the core to keep pace with rapid technological development in the proteomics field. The instrument will support NIH-funded researchers investigating gene regulation, phosphoproteomics, glycoproteomics, and vaccine response, with potential applications in cancer biology and infectious disease. Instrument time will be available to UAMS researcher through the core. The Proteomics Core is directed by Alan Tackett, Ph.D. and Rick Edmondson, Ph.D. Dr. Mackintosh is responsible for day-to-day operation of the core. Dr. Mackintosh’s grant is the first High-End Instrumentation Grant to be awarded by the NIH in the state of Arkansas.

The Proteomics Core is also supported by the Arkansas IDeA Network for Biomedical Research Excellence (P20GM103429), the UA Center for Protein Structure and Function (P30GM103450), and the UAMS Center for Microbial Pathogenesis and Host Inflammatory Responses (P20GM103625).

 

BOERMA TO ESTABLISH NSBRI’S CENTER FOR SPACE RADIATION RESEARCH (CSRR)
The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will establish, fund, and operate the Center for Space Radiation Research (CSRR) under the leadership of Marjan Boerma, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences at UAMS’ College of Pharmacy Division of Radiation Health. Dr. Boerma will direct a team of investigators working across 4 U.S. institutions, to implement the 3 year and $6 million dollar mission of the CSRR.

 

UAMS RESEARCH GRANT MONEY STRONG DESPITE DIFFICULT FUNDING ENVIRONMENT
UAMS research funding remained strong during fiscal year 2013-2014, strengthening the state’s economy with the ability to innovate and grow new business.

DRUG DISCOVERY & DEVELOPMENT COLLOQUIUM

Held on June 20-21, 2014 and organized by College of Pharmacy graduate students and a student group associated with the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, the colloquium drew 115 attendees, said Sharaddha Thakkar, a bioinformatics Ph.D. candidate at UAMS and the conference chair. Researchers from across a multi-state region including Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee as well as Cornell University in New York and Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja in Ecuador were in attendance at the successful research event.

 

2012-2013 DEAN’S DISTINGUISHED FACULTY SCHOLAR

Mark Smeltzer, Ph.D., Professor of Microbiology & Immunology at UAMS for the past 20 years and one of the nation’s top microbial pathogenesis researchers was honored as the 2012-2013 Dean’s Distinguished Faculty Scholar.

 

5 YEAR GRANT AWARDED TO STUDY GOLGI APPARATUS VIA HOLOGRAHY

Brian Storrie, Ph.D., Vladimir Lupashin, Ph.D. and colleagues received a novel 5-year grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop super-resolution holography methods to study the Golgi apparatus and defects associated with conditions such as glaucoma, chlamydia infection, neurodegenerative disease, viral entry and aging.

 

RESEARCH TRAINING GRANT IN PHARMACOLOGY/TOXICOLOGY
The College of Medicine Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology was awarded $665,000 over the next five years from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences to support research training for predoctoral fellows. The T32 was matched by the COM, Translational Research Institute, and campus funds in the successful application.

 

EDITOR’S AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING CLINICAL RESEARCH
William Culp, M.D., Prof. Radiology, received the Editor’s Award for Outstanding Clinical Research from the Journal of Vascular & Interventional Radiology at the April 2013 national meeting. Students Sean Woods and Kaleb Smithson received research awards and recognition along with Michael Borrelli, Ph.D.

 

BEHIND THE MASK: THE PHARMACOLOGY OF BATH SALTS
The cover of the latest edition of Neuropsychopharmacology features a mannuscript co-authored by William Fantegrossi, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, and UAMS students Brenda Gannon (Interdisciplinary Toxicology) and Sarah Zimmerman (Interdisciplinary Biomedical Sciences), along with Kenner C. Rice, Ph.D., Chief of the Chemical Biology Research Branch and Chief of the Drug Design and Synthesis Section at the National Institute on Drug Abuse). Their article characterizes the behavioral pharmacology of a key component of emerging ‘Bath Salt’ drugs of abuse. Despite the seemingly innocuous name, “bath salt” products contain powerful mood-altering substances. Strategic modifications to the chemical structures of illicit substances allowed, until very recently, legal access to bath salt products and the use of sophisticated techniques to market and distribute them.

 

VA GRANT AWARDED TO STUDY NEW TREATMENTS FOR ANGIOGENESIS AND ATHEROSCLEROSIS
Dr. Jay Mehta et. al., was awarded a four year, $689,000, Veteran’s Administration grant to study new treatments for angiogenesis and atherosclerosis.

 

COBRE GRANT AWARDED TO STUDY MICROBIAL PATHOGENS AND THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE BODY TO CAUSE DISEASE
September 26, 2012 – Mark Smeltzer, Ph.D. was awarded a $10 million COBRE grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for work studying microbial pathogens and their interactions with the body to cause disease. The funding establishes a UAMS Center for Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) and supports the work of 4 young investigators focused on studying how microbial pathogens interact with the human body to cause disease.